“United States”

In Julian Schnabel’s studio

An hour with Julian Schnabel, who shares with Art Media Agency reflections on the ground he has covered, the Plate Paintings series, surface and matter, film, sun and shade… An encounter in Manhattan. Born in 1951 in New York, the city where he continues to live, Julian Schnabel has maintained a reputation as an undisciplined artist. Winning the attention of critics early on while refusing to be pinned down by any particular style, he also became known to the public in 1996 thanks to his film Basquiat. Ever since, he has continued to paint, sculpt and make feature films when he’s not surfing near his villa in Montauk. And let’s not forget: Julian Schnabel is also an interior architect… It was incidentally in his Venetian palace in the West Village, New York, that he received us – at the heart of the Palazzo Chupi, in which the artist has based his studio and apartment, with a view of the Hudson…   At the very start of your career in the 1970s, did you feel close to European movements such as the Italian Transavanguardia? In terms of style, we get this impression, but did you know the artists that made up the movement such as Francesco Clemente, Sandro Chia, Enzo Cucchi or Mimmo Paladino? In 1982, when Harald Szeemann curated the “Settore Arti Visive” exhibition in which I took part at the Venice Biennale, Francesco Clemente was one of the artists. I then saw him again when Jean-Christophe Ammann showed us in Basel, along with Enzo Cucchi and Sandro Chia, and we started to keep up with one another. I particularly liked the work of Clemente, especially from that period, and we then became friends, but before this encounter, I didn’t know who these artists were.   This was also...

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Chicago Area Museums: Recent Acquisitions…

Representatives from three top Chicago area museums recently shared with Art Media Agency details of their recent acquisitions. The historical and stylistic range demonstrates a continued high level of commitment to strengthening the permanent collections of the city’s vital art institutions. Founded in 1879, The Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) is one of the most important and visited art institutions in the world. Their permanent collection includes more than 300,000 objects and represents every historical period, nationality and culture. The newest addition to the museum came in 2009, with the creation of its Modern Wing, which enhanced the institution with 264,000 square feet of exhibition space and educational facilities and features state-of-the-art green technology. The Art Institute of Chicago is supported through donations and admission fees, though special free admission times are frequent, and include free admission Thursday evenings from 5:00 to 8:00 pm year round to residents of the State of Illinois. The Art Institute of Chicago has acquired Christ Carrying the Cross, by the 16th Century Italian painter Sebastiano del Piombo. The painting was only recently rediscovered, and was brought to the attention of the AIC by London-based art gallery Colnaghi, who facilitated the transfer of the painting to the museum. “We couldn’t be more thrilled to have this rare and wonderful opportunity to bring such an important painting—our first by Sebastiano—into the Art Institute’s permanent collection,” said Gloria Groom, David and Mary Winton Green Curator and Chair of European Painting and Sculpture for the AIC. Sebastiano del Piombo is notable as one of the only major painters of the High Renaissance to combine the Venetian School’s focus on color with the Mannerist’s exaggeration of proportions. As a result his work was hailed for its ability to evoke a monumental, heroic elegance while still attaining the more...

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Chartreuse Gallery closes in Phoenix

Nancy Hill has announced the imminent closure of the Chartreuse Gallery, which she opened in 2015 in the Bragg’s Pie Factory, on Grand Avenue in Phoenix. Since the gallery’s opening, over 100 artists have been exhibited, but due to cash-flow problems, the project is now forced to close, Hill told The Phoenix New Times. The gallerist previously ran two other spaces which have also closed, and is also the owner of a typography workshop Hazel & Violet, which seems to be in better financial...

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London’s Seventeen Gallery opens a New York branch

Dave Hoyland recently inaugurated, on 20 November in New York, Seventeen Gallery’s new address at 214 Bowery on the Lower East Side, not far from the International Center of Photography and the New Museum. The young British gallerist who opened Seventeen Gallery in 2005 in the London district of Shoreditch, has a reputation as a fine talent finder. Defining himself, in an interview with Artnet, as an artist who produces mediocre work, he has, on the other hand, successfully launched post-internet artists including Jon Rafman, Oliver Laric and Hannah...

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Barbara Bloom at David Lewis

David Lewis Gallery in New York has announced that it now represents artist Barbara Bloom. This conceptual artist, born in 1951 in Los Angeles and a pupil of John Baldessari, is often associated with the Pictures Generation movement, known for its critical analysis of the media and its appropriation of images. Her work questions our perception of objects via installations, photographs, paintings and sculptures, and is based on the collection of objects. One of her major installations, The Reign of Narcissism (1989), offers a juxtaposition of objects from different eras, supposed to represent good taste and refinement – notions which the artist questions while making fun of the narcissistic and monomaniac dimension of the collector. In The Collections of Barbara Bloom in 2008, she showed personal objects and works in a self-portrait which demonstrated her artistic quest while playing with the codes of the retrospective. Barbara Bloom’s work is shown all over the world and features in major public collections. The artist recently obtained a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, reports...

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