“Richard Phillips”

Richard Phillips at Gagosian Athens

Until 1 August 2015, Gagosian Gallery in Athens, Greece, is hosting a series of new paintings by American artist Richard Phillips. Through his paintings, Phillips engages the theme of human obsessions regarding sexuality, politics, power, and death, which are constantly exploited in mainstream media. Subjecting popular images to a range of classical painterly techniques, he imbues them with new meaning. Expanding upon postmodern appropriation strategies through new and historical painting techniques, Phillips manipulates, recombines, amplifies, and undermines canonical images, challenging their dominant influence in contemporary culture. Departing from the more photorealistic tendencies of recent years, in his newest works Phillips uses celebrity portraits, retro textbook illustrations, logos, and Op Art motifs to produce compressed images. In the Warholian portrait Jim Morrison (2015), the rock star’s face is mirrored flatly and mechanically against a bright green background, while in Chinchillas and Guinea Pigs (2015), animals are similarly reduced to graphic silhouettes adorned with neon red, orange, and yellow stripes reminiscent of 1980s surf wear. Richard Phillips was born in Massachusetts in 1962, and currently lives and works in New York. His works can be found in the public collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Denver Art Museum, Colorado; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas; Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; Tate Modern, London; and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The...

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Fears over the future of Elmgreen & Dragset’s Prada Marfa

Texas, 1 October 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA). Supporters of Elmgreen & Dragset’s Prada Marfa installation (2005), have joined together in an attempt to defend the piece, after it was recently deemed illegal by the Texas Department of Transportation. Authorities are yet to announce definite plans to tear down the structure – a fake Prada boutique in the middle of the Chihuahuan desert – though a pre-emptory “Save Prada Marfa” Facebook page has attracted nearly 4,000 likes since appearing on 20 September. This has been joined by a e-mail in praise of the work, released by Galerie Nicolai Wallner, which represents Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset. The message stated: “The work is a poignant critique of our contemporary consumer culture and holds an important place within contemporary art history… We kindly ask that you please join the efforts to save Prada Marfa so that we may all enjoy the work for years to come.” The controversy surrounding the work follows a similar response to Richard Phillips’s recent Playboy sculpture, also installed along the highway. The neon sign was classified as illegal in June, with authorities citing the lack of an advertising permit, but the work has nevertheless remained standing. Fans of Prada Marfa hope the work will be similarly resilient....

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Playboy Installation by Richard Phillips deemed illegal

Texas, 10 July 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA). The El Paso Times has reported that a new installation by Richard Phillips, created in collaboration with Neville Wakefield and Playboy, in Marfa, Texas, has been deemed illegal by the Texas Department of Transportation. The installation features a 40-foot tall, neon Playboy logo next to an elevated sculpture of a car. In Texas, it is illegal to place corporate logos in public spaces without a permit. A local resident of Marfa found that the installation did not have a permit, and consequently filed a complaint to the Texas Department of Transportation, who have given 45 days for the work to be removed. Though the location may seem unlikely, this is not the first installation piece to be created in Marfa, Texas; a permanent installation created by artists Elmgreen and Dragset in 2005 features an apparently Prada store, set amongst vast, empty...

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Richard Phillips at the Gagosian Gallery of New York

New York, 5 September 2012. Art Media Agency (AMA). The Gagosian Gallery in New York will be displaying Richard Phillips’s works between 11 September and 20 October 2012. Criticism is as much an intrinsic material in the artist’s artistic approach as the materials chosen for the concrete carrying out these works. Phillips has embarked on a new journey regarding his production, emphasising on the conscience and subjectivity of subjects. Lindsay Lohan (2011) and Sasha Grey (2011), his first two films, made their debut at the “Commercial Break” film project at the 2011 Venice Biennale. Both actresses project their image and beauty in the films’ plots. Phillips’s third film, First Point (2012) marks his second collaboration with Lohan and third collaboration with legendary filmmaker Taylor Steele. Born in Massachusetts in 1962, Richard Phillips lives and works in New York. He has displayed his works in many exhibitions in Europe and in the United...

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“Lindsay Lohan” by Richard Phillips at Gagosian Gallery

New York, 27 May 2011, Art Media Agency (AMA). From 1 June to 5 June 2011, the Gagosian Gallery is exhibiting Richard Phillips’s new work Lindsay Lohan. The piece will be presented at the “Commercial break” exhibition hosted by the Garage Center for Contemporary Culture in Venice. Lindsay Lohan was sentenced to thirty days under house arrest and 480 hours of community service after committing several offences. Richard Phillips immortalised the actrice in a 90-second video. “The film depicts Lohan in a number of classical poses, with references to iconic moments in film, such as Brigitte Bardot smoldering in Jean-Luc Godard’s Contempt, or the searing psychosexual interplay of Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullman in Ingmar Bergman’s Persona” as reported on fadwebsite.org. In reality, the work hints at the actress’s problems with the law. Richard Phillips’ work therefore manages to integrate his art into video format, creating a new kind of portrait.  ...

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