“France”

Work, somewhere between emancipation and alienation

At the back of the first exhibition room, a McDonald’s lies submerged by water. Upstairs, a poster retraces the evolution of anarchy in France. Classroom desks and benches are set out here and there. This summer, the FRAC Champagne-Ardenne is gathering artists around the notion of work… According to the Larousse dictionary, work is “human activity applied towards producing, creating or maintaining something”. Does artistic practice fall into this category? As he strolls around around a city, artist Francis Alÿs pushes a block of ice until it melts, allows a thread from his sweater to unravel until nothing is left of it, attracts metallic objects with the help of a magnet. His performances carried out in public space at the end of the 1990s bring, head to head, the action of doing something, and its result. “Sometimes, doing nothing amounts to doing something and doing something amounts to doing nothing,” he explains. Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing also reveals the apparent uselessness of certain acts, namely artistic ones, according to a production-driven perspective. Since the objective of artistic practice is not utility, some believe it to be futile. And unlike the case of French intermittents de spectacle (contract workers in the entertainment industry), artists’ thinking time – these pauses which interrupt active production, necessary in order for thought, ideas, and the artistic work to emerge – receive no economic recognition. The question of the artist’s status in society is also at the heart of Patricio Gil Flood’s reflections. Since 2012, the Argentinean has focused his research on work, namely the status of the worker-artist, a question that is as topical in his country of origin as in France. In his work Travailler moins pour lire plus, published in 2015, he gathers philosophical, sociological and artistic texts that oppose...

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A.R. Penck, a man of openness

A.R. Penck passed away while the Fondation Maeght’s major retrospective on him was underway. A few days after the sad news, Suzanne Tarasiève gallery also opened an exhibition on the artist. Two paths for tracing the complexity of the work of A.R. Penck. A homage. A.R. Penck left this world on 2 May in Zurich at the age of 77 years. Symbolically, the exhibition being held on him at the Fondation Maeght is titled “A.R. Penck. Rites de passage”. This will therefore be the last retrospective to be organised on the artist during his lifetime, and also the first homage to be paid to him. Homage accompanied by the exhibition “À travers A.R. Penck” at Suzanne Tarasiève (Paris), which represents several big figures from German painting: Georg Baselitz, Markus Lüpertz, Jörg Immendorff. Only Sigmar Polke and Gerhard Richter are absent from the list. A tumultuous life Ralf Winkler – this was the name he was born under – had a tumultuous life. He was born on 5 October 1939 in Dresden, in a Germany that would be designated as part of the “East” in 1949. Between 1956 and 1966, Ralf tried, unsuccessfully four times, to enter fine-arts schools in Dresden and East Berlin, even if he was not particularly troubled by this failure. He preferred contact with the “renegades” rather than the institutional painters – he would also be denied access to the Society of Artists of the German Democratic Republic. Already, in the middle of the 1960s, he adopted the pseudonym A.R. Penck for various reasons. Firstly, to pay homage to Albrecht Penck, a geologist specialising in the Ice Age. But above all, to get his works across the border more easily and to avoid censorship problems. The artist would take on other aliases: Tancred Michel or Théodor...

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Sultan Sooud Al-Qassemi: an influential collector

“100 Masterpieces of Modern and Contemporary Arab Art”… This is the title of the exhibition currently showing at the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA) in Paris, unveiling part of the Sooud Al-Qassemi collection. We meet the young collector behind the Barjeel Art Collection based in the United Arab Emirates. The IMA exhibition presents modern and contemporary Arab works in two parts. The first, “Exhibiting”, is based on the curatorial model of the traditional exhibition; the second, “Curating”, offers a scenography inspired by a museum’s reserve collection. Here, we find figures from the international scene: Adel Abdessemed, Etel Adnan, Walead Beshty and also Hayv Kahraman. But we also discover modern artists less well-known by the French public, such as Ahmed Cherkaoui and Achraf Touloub. Let’s bear in mind that Sooud Al-Qassemi has already organised exhibitions in Singapore, London, Toronto, Teheran… and others opening shortly in Amman, Washington DC and Dubai. As well as launching the Barjeel Art Foundation in Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates in February 2010, the energetic collector produces and presents a television programme (Art Plus, on AJ Plus Arabi).   How many works make up your collection? The Barjeel Foundation conserves around 600 works – as well as artists’ editions –, mainly modern and contemporary works. Works date from 2015-2016 back to the 19th century. My idea, in setting up this foundation, was to promote and present Arab art everywhere in the world. I find that foundations and museums aren’t active enough. We’re the opposite of that, and we really want to exceed the current limits, even if it’s much more difficult at the moment with the situation in Syria and elsewhere. We want to show another face of the Arab world, not just a negative one. In the Arab world, many works have been destroyed,...

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Lionel Sabatté, long-term cycles

It’s spring all year round for Lionel Sabatté as he bounces from one exhibition to another, one project to another. Art Media Agency visited him in his studio to learn more about his news, his work, his evolutions. A portrait. Lionel Sabatté started 2017 under the sun of Los Angeles where he’s occupied a studio for the last two years. He went on to the refreshing coolness of his second studio in Le Pré-Saint-Gervais, just next to Paris – which still offers a fair share of fine spells. The youthful forty-something originating from Toulouse is currently showing his sculptures in the courtyard of the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature in Paris while hundreds of his works have been chosen for the “Golem” show at the MAHJ (Paris) and “Vies d’ordures” at the MUCEM (Marseille). On top of this, Galerie C presented a solo show of his work at Drawing Now in March, and – the icing on the cake – he won the prize awarded by the fair. Yet another honour after already winning the awards distributed by the Institut Français in Mauritius, Yishu 8 (Beijing), and the Prix Patio La Maison Rouge last year. This rhythm confirms the brisk pace at which things are moving ahead for Lionel Sabatté. Already in 2010, Éva Hober included him in the “La belle peinture est derrière nous” exhibition, shown at Sanat Limani (Istanbul) before travelling to Ankara, to the Lieu Unique (Nantes) and to Slovenia. But the critical shift to the next gear occurred in 2011 when the artist was shown by Patricia Dorfmann at the Museum d’Histoire Naturelle, as part of the FIAC’s “outside-the-walls” itinerary. Here, he presented La Meute in the Galerie de l’Évolution, a series of five wolves made from clumps of dust gathered from...

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The wheel of fortune

Elegant and persuasive, she embodies the discreet charm of private banking as the head of one bank’s art department. An hour with Mathilde Courteault of Neuflize OBC. Former director of the Asian art department of Ch­ris­tie’s in Paris, Ma­thilde Cour­teault, thirty-nine years old, welcomes us into the muffled rooms of a big private bank. Holder of a master’s in art history on “the European influence on Mughal miniatures”, this lively, enthusiastic woman has been managing, for three years now, the art assets of a clientele subject to France’s ISF (wealth tax). We talk about culture and investment strategy, collections and assets. It’s also a chance to discuss major trends on the art market, the concept of pleasure-investment… All this with the discretion and poise that are characteristic of wealth-management companies.   What exactly does art-wealth expertise involve? What does this profession consist in? The profession has existed in our bank for twenty-five years. We deploy our expertise in an integrated structure, wholly dedicated to consultancy and the management of art wealth. This, incidentally, is a specificity that is written into our company’s DNA. As the owner of a photograph collection and also as a sponsor of the Cinémathèque, a partner of the Palais de Tokyo, moreover holding ties to the Musée Jacquemart-André, Neuflize OBC is firmly anchored in the cultural domain. Let’s say that expertise is developed in three areas. First, the concrete management of collections which encompasses a full range of services for art assets, including storage of artworks in reserved strongboxes, offering museum-like conservation with controlled hygrometry. We of course offer insurance packages. We can also offer advice to clients wishing to make copies of their paintings or to get restoration work done. When we have collection-management mandates, we can also administer the loans of works to...

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