“Centre Pompidou Malaga”

Centre Pompidou Malaga: three years down the track

On the strength of its success, the Centre Pompidou Malaga, inaugurated in March 2015 and initially set up for a five-year period, recently had its stay in Spain extended until 2025. A progress report on its first three years and a review of a pilot project in favour of cultural decentralisation. Rumours had been flying around the streets of the Andalusian city for several weeks, but it was on 20 February that they were confirmed by Serge Lasvignes, president of the Centre Pompidou, and Francisco de la Torre, the mayor of Malaga. The inaugural planting of the Parisian museum overseas was an experiment. And after three years of operations, the assessment of the Centre Pompidou Malaga is highly satisfactory, resulting in an extension of the project and the prospect of new ones. Two branches will shortly emerge in Brussels and Shanghai. Museums proliferate in Malaga… Home to 570,000 inhabitants, the city contains no less than 36 museums, including the Museo Picasso, the Museo Carmen Thyssen and the first branch of the Russian Art Museum of Saint Petersburg, inaugurated in the same week as the Centre Pompidou’s Spanish site. This multiplication of art institutions is partially explained by the mayor’s policy, making access to culture a priority. By taking this stand, Francisco de la Torre hopes to boost tourism and bring economic vitality back to Malaga, a city heavily affected by the crisis. To finance the Centre Pompidou project, the municipality paid over 7 millions euros and committed to pay 1.5 million euros every year to the Parisian institution, for use of its image and exhibition design. Museum strategy as a cultural and economic springboard is an appealing idea in itself, but not always adapted to every spot. In the case of Malaga, it seems realistic. As Picasso’s city of...

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