“Brussels”

Rendezvous at the Patinoire Royale!

It’s a majestic space stretching over nearly 3,000 m2, which once delighted roller skaters. Today it’s an exhibition space with a difference, in the middle of Brussels. We spend an hour with Valérie Bach and find out about her commitment to contemporary art… at the heart of a historic monument. Valérie Bach moved to Brussels in 2005. At that time, she opened her first art gallery in the Sablon district. It was in 2007 that she and her husband discovered La Patinoire Royale, a neo-classical building constructed in 1877 right in the centre of the Belgian capital. Semi-circular arch windows, a magnificent Polonceau structure, period glasswork… They fell in love with it immediately, and very soon after, the couple bought the site. As of 2012, the Galerie Valérie Bach began presenting its programme on this site in the wing looking out onto Rue Faider, while restoration of the building’s nave continued, overseen by the Jean-Paul Hermant and Pierre Yovanovitch architecture firms. It was thus in April 2015 that Valérie Bach, along with her director Constantin Chariot and his team, inaugurated this new hybrid venue which has preserved its historic name. Already, three exhibitions have taken place here: “La Résistance des images”, showing nearly 170 works representing major figures in narrative figuration, curated by Jean-Jacques Aillagon; “Let’s Move!”, a vast retrospective of kinetic art organised by Arnauld Pierre; and “Prouvé / Takis” organised in collaboration with the gallery Downtown. And now, until 25 March, and for the first time since the opening of La Patinoire, all of the venue’s spaces are being handed over to one artist: Joana Vasconcelos from Portugal, whose show includes a few monumental works. You are the manager of the Patinoire, as well as of the gallery bearing your name. What is the relationship between these two spaces? Despite...

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The search for the Belgian collector

They’re said to be demanding, eclectic, international… and above all, very numerous. Who are the Belgian collectors? A foretaste and a scan before meeting them face to face in the alleys of the BRAFA. As a small bilingual country at the heart of Europe, Belgium is often presented as “the country with the highest number of collectors per square metre”. In the absence of any global study on the matter, it’s impossible to confirm this, but what is certain is that Belgium is well and truly a “land of collectors,” declares Axel Gryspeerdt, president of Collectiana, a foundation aimed at studying and developing art and culture collections. But things get trickier when it’s a matter of defining “the” Belgian collector. “There’s no typical profile for the Belgian collector, and if ever Belgians present specific features, they result from a blend of factors such as internationalisation, networking, the multitude of exhibitions being held,” adds Axel Gryspeerdt. No identikit emerges, therefore, but we can single out the characteristics of these key players in the art world. Collectors that weren’t born yesterday “The collecting tradition dates back to Flanders in the 15th century when many orders of portraits and triptychs were placed,” comments Tanguy Eeckhout, curator at the Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in Laethem-Saint-Martin. “The 16th and 17th centuries carried on this enthusiasm with the creation of curiosity cabinets, before a slowdown in the economy – and collections – until the end of the 19th century. Following World War II, there emerged a new generation of collectors who turned towards American art and conceptual art,” he adds. When the Sixties and Seventies shook things up, collectors showed support for Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Niele Toroni and many others, years before these artists gained institutional recognition. This no doubt sparked the reputation of boldness among...

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Julio Le Parc, a tireless creator

The Brussels fair is paying homage to a founding member of the Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel (GRAV) by welcoming four of Julio Le Parc’s monumental works. An opportunity to look over the career of this indomitable artist.   Julio Le Parc had to wait a long time before institutions began to recognise him in the way that he deserves. Today, the Argentinian artist is finally being given his dues, now acknowledged as “a living legend” in the art world, as the Galerie Perrotin hastens to describe him. Having decided to represent him since November 2016, this gallery has kicked off its collaboration with the artist with a solo exhibition in its space in New York – a city where Julio Le Parc has not been shown since 1973. “It was time to rectify this error,” notes the Parisian gallery. Offering an interesting bridge towards the retrospective prepared by Pérez Art Museum in Miami (visible until 19 March 2017), the Perrotin exhibition presented both recent works and iconic pieces, already seen in major monographic shows such as the one at the Palais de Tokyo in 2013. It was the latter event that truly marked Julio Le Parc’s return to favour. The institution, having undergone a makeover, reopened with this retrospective organised by Jean de Loisy: 2,000 m2 devoted to the artist and gathering historic works including Continuel Mobile from 1963, today visible at BRAFA. Drawing 180,000 visitors, the Palais de Tokyo show met with success amongst critics and the general public alike. It followed up “Le Parc Lumière”, organised by the Daros Latinamerica Collection in Zurich in 2005, and the Centre Pompidou Metz exhibition in 2011-2012 titled “Erre”, a collective show which devoted an entire room to Julio Le Parc’s works… after 20 years in purgatory. Julio Le Parc...

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BRAFA, at the heart of the art market

In Brussels this January, over four thousand years of art will be making their way to BRAFA. From archaeology to contemporary creation, this is not only a major European event, but a place to sound out the art market as a new year begins. In January, after getting back from New Year’s Eve at Saint-Barthélemy, when nothing else seems to quite make the grade, not even a little omelette dotted with Alba white truffles, a quick dash to Brussels is just the thing! Why favour a Flemish destination, you might well ask? A yearning for the Belgian touch in the heart of winter? The timeless charm of the Place de Brouckère? Let’s put it this way: at the start of the year, the chicest rendezvous — one month after Art Basel on the coast of Florida in December, and shortly before the Armory Show in New York in March — is obviously BRAFA. Also known as the Brussels Art Fair, one of the oldest art and antiques fairs in the world. So much to say, the most stunning Brussels invention… just after the Délirium Café and its 3,000 beers. So let’s sum up: after its fine fare and brilliant beer, Brussels, from Saturday 21 to Sunday 29 January, can also offer you what is undoubtedly the very best in terms of antiques. Of course, some may well be inclined to say that nothing beats the Biennale des Antiquaires, that going shopping in Paris in September is the height of sophistication. Or that for fine-arts lovers, Frieze Masters in October in London is a genuine revelation, an aesthetic shock that will keep you hyped up and buzzing until Christmas… In short, for too long people have looked down at BRAFA — take the blasé collector who describes the Belgian fair...

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EU cancels its funding to southern Italy

The European Union is withdrawing its funding to southern Italy, namely to Sicily, Calabria and Campania. These three regions failed to use the EU funding accorded to them, namely $57.7 million in 2015 for Sicily alone. A report commissioned by Brussels has revealed that projects for renovating Sicily’s cultural and historic heritage between 2007 and 2013 are riddled with numerous errors, inconsistencies, fake figures and also fake email addresses. The situation poses a direct threat to cultural heritage, namely the Castello Normanno-Svevo, constructed near the Sicilian port of Augusta by Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century; for this site, the Union offered $11.3 million in funding that was unused by Italian authorities due to the lack of a relevant project. A similar situation arose in relation to the Aidone Archaeological Museum in Sicily that wished to renovate its galleries but failed to put forward a reliable project according to EU criteria. Meanwhile, in Naples, a $113.3 million grant for conserving churches was not paid as the application did not reach the EU by the set deadline. The director of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, Mechtild Rössler, wrote to the Italian minister of culture and to Italian UNESCO delegates in January, asking them for explanations on this situation that directly threatens heritage in these...

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